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Recycle Batteries to Protect Groundwater

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Did you know that Americans dump approximately 2.5 billion batteries into landfills each year? Although that accounts for only 0.5% of the total U.S. waste, decomposing batteries contribute more than 50% of the mercury and cadmium pollution found in landfills. Such toxic heavy metals can contaminate groundwater, posing a risk to our drinking water supplies.

Recycle spent batteries and use rechargeable batteries when possible. But remember, batteries can't be included with your other recyclables.

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Gardeners: Have a Green Thumb

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Conserving water is one of the most effective ways that you can reduce stormwater pollution. Excess water that is wasted from over watering your lawn can become contaminated with fertilizers, pesticides, dirt, and debris before it reaches the storm drain. Be more efficient by watering during cooler times of the day, such as the morning and evening, and adjust sprinklers if water is running into the driveway, sidewalks, or the street. Also, consider landscaping with native plants that do not require as much watering, or try using mulch to help retain moisture.

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Drivers: Green Car Care

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One of the best ways to reduce the pollution associated with your car is to use it less. Try to link trips when running errands to avoid multiple outings. When possible, make an effort to arrange carpools or use public transportation. Or, use your bike to get around in beautiful San Diego!

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Pet Owners: Clean up after Fido

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Be sure to regularly clean up after your pet, and dispose of waste in the trash or sanitary sewer system. When washed into storm drains, the bacteria that is associated with animal feces can pose a serious threat to human health. Don't forget to bring a baggie when you walk your pet, and pick up after your pooch whether you're on public or private land - it's the law!

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Take the Trolley to Work

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Did you know that the typical American family spends about $8,000 per year operating cars? With the cost of fuel on the rise, commuting to work every day not only costs you money, but emits harmful air pollution and greenhouse gasses. How about trying the trolley or bus for one or two days per week?

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