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Board of Port Commissioners Amends Clean Truck Program

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Trucks entering the Tenth Avenue Marine Terminal must comply with California Air Resources Board regulations.The Board of Port Commissioners on July 6, 2010, amended its Clean Truck Program to ban trucks that are not compliant with California Air Resources Board regulations from entering its marine terminals. The ban begins on January 1, 2011.

This action upholds the California Air Resources Board's drayage truck regulations to reduce air emissions from trucks that transport cargo to and from California ports.

"This is an important program that speaks to public safety and security for workers on the terminals and the residents of communities neighboring the marine terminals," Port Commissioner Lee Burdick said.

The Clean Truck Program will allow non-compliant trucks a one-time pass onto the terminals through 2011 to accommodate out-of-state truckers who may not be familiar with the new regulations.

RTI truck driver Jaime Galarza, left, reviews truck registry information with wharfinger David Carrillo at the customer service station at the Tenth Avenue Marine Terminal.The state regulations call for diesel-fueled, heavy duty trucks to meet specific air emission standards and to register in the state's database, or "drayage truck registry." Drayage trucks move cargo from a marine terminal to a distribution point.

The Port of San Diego has opened customer service stations at its Tenth Avenue and National City Marine Terminals to provide truck drivers with information about how to comply with California Air Resources Board regulations for trucks entering marine terminals.

So far, more than 1,600 truckers arriving at the Tenth Avenue or National City Marine Terminals have received information and assistance at these stations.

The customer service stations will continue to operate and are a key part of the Port of San Diego's Clean Truck Program. The program supports reducing the impact of cargo movement on the communities surrounding the marine terminals.

"We're the messengers," said wharfinger David Carrillo while manning the station at the Tenth Avenue Marine Terminal. "Currently we're here to provide information to the truckers about what they need to do to comply with CARB regulations."

Carrillo said sometimes the drivers don't realize that these are two different systems.

Trucks need to be registered in the state's drayage truck registry in order to establish their compliance with the regulation. Registration in the Port's e-Modal system allows the Port to quickly, and electronically, track trucks that enter the terminals.

Currently, the customer service station provides brochures and fact sheets in multiple languages to explain the statewide drayage truck regulation program. The customer service stations will also supply information about the Port's new rules to enforce the state regulations.

The customer service station at the Tenth Avenue Marine Terminal is located in a trailer near the main entry gate.Port -contracted security guards check the license plates of trucks at the marine terminal entry gates to determine if they are registered in the data bases. The drivers of trucks that are not registered are referred to a customer service station for assistance.

At the Tenth Avenue Marine Terminal, the station is located in a trailer near the main entry gate. The customer service station at the National City Marine Terminal, which opened on June 28, is located in the wharfinger office.

Recently, RTI truck driver Jaime Galarza stopped in at the customer service station at the Tenth Avenue Marine Terminal to clarify a registry issue. He was at the terminal to pick up a load of Dole bananas for transport to Fresno.

"Stopping into the customer service station was helpful," Galarza said. "Time is money."

The customer service stations are open Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. until 3 p.m.

Assisting truck drivers to comply with California Air Resources Board regulations helps ensure a smooth flow of cargo transport to and from the terminals.